Hippie by Paulo Coelho

Hippie, Paulo Coelho’s most autobiographical book, is a nostalgic trip down memory lane about his days as a hippie, and is a beautiful story about friendship, love, the search for meaning and realizing that getting closer to oneself demands many tough choices.

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Red Sorghum by Mo Yan

Red Sorghum is a novel about the brutal terror, pillage and rape that innocent civilians had to face in the dark days of the Chinese civil war and the Sino-Japanese war in the 1930s.

Suttree by Cormac McCarthy

Humans are so full of silences and screams and suspense that we look forward to the next day with equal parts enthusiasm and equal parts anxiety. Thoughts of doom and death are never far from one’s mind. Suttree, difficult though its prose is, makes all this vocal, almost visual.

Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

Once upon a time, six human species roamed the Earth. Now, only one does. What happened to the others? How did Sapiens gain dominance of the entire world? How did we progress through history, build empires, become a global community that we are today? More importantly, what does it truly tell us about ourselves and where we are headed?

Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini

War. Destruction. The never after. In Sea Prayer, a beautifully written, poignant piece, Khaled Hosseini commemorates the death of Alan Khurdi, the 3-year-old Syrian boy whose body washed ashore the coast of Turkey in 2015 as he tried to flee a war-torn Syria, by way of the sea. The image of Alan’s lifeless body sparked a massive emotional response, opening the eyes of the rest of the world to the horrors of the Syrian situation and the trauma of refugees.

Human Traces by Sebastian Faulks

What does it mean to be human? Is madness the price we pay for it? Sebastian Faulks explores this fragile thread that connects human consciousness with the depravity of the mind in his novel, Human Traces.